Academic Year 2020 Courses

Academic Year 2020 Courses

Our courses provide opportunities for our members to delve more deeply into fascinating subjects, hear from outstanding teachers, and have fun as well: no exams, no grades, but ample opportunities to participate in discussions.

The courses vary a great deal in length, but the donation we ask for each course is the same — $20/person/course. Because the lecturers are not compensated (except for the pleasure of having truly interested and interesting students), your contributions are used for scholarships for re-entry and transfer students.

For all course registrations, you will receive an email acknowledging your acceptance in the course. For on-line registrations, it will be automatically generated and sent shortly after you register. For mail-in registration, we manually send you an email confirmation. In either case, later you will receive a letter from the university acknowledging your donation.

You will not be charged if you can't enroll (because the course is full), and if you sent a check it will be returned.

You must be a OLLI member to sign up for Courses!

→ Courses are limited to 2020 members of Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UCSC. If you wish to join, go to our home page and use the section titled Join OLLI at UCSC or Renew Your Membership.  There might be a delay after renewal before your OLLI status is changed for online access to courses.  If you have not had your status changed you will get a blank set of courses when you go to the signup page.

On Line Registration is available!


University Calendar Fall  2020 Courses are shown below.  

If instead of registering for courses on-line, you want to print, fill-out, and mail a paper registration form, then click here to print the registration form. Download the form to your computer, print it, fill it out, and mail it as directed on the form.

REGISTER EARLY SO THERE WILL BE SUFFICIENT SEATING AND COURSE MATERIALS.

Courses Table of Contents

Click on links, below, for details:
2001 – Gulliver's Travels
2002 – International Affairs: Fall 2019
2003 - The Birth of Contemporary Chinese Fiction 1920s
2004 - Women in Western Civilization from Ancient Near East to 18th Century 
2005 - Search for Life in the Universe
2006 - Film Comedy
2007 - Modern Molecular Biology

Gulliver's Travels

September 9, 16, 23, 30      10-12 in the morning
Location: Museum of Art and History, 705 Front St.
Instructor: Bill Park

You are cordially invited to attend four classes on Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels (1727), recognized as a classic the day it was published and never since out of print. How did Swift do it? On the one hand the book is a humorous easy-to-read account of four imaginary voyages, somewhat akin to science fiction. But on the other hand it is a satire on eighteenth-century England, a savage indictment of human nature, an uncanny and prophetic prophecy of our own modernity. It is at the same time enjoyable and thought-provoking. Welcome to the discussion.

 [Recommended text: Gulliver’s Travels (Penguin Classics)]

 Bill Park is an Emeritus Professor of Literature at Sarah Lawrence College, where he taught for many years. He received his PhD in Eighteenth Century English Literature from Columbia University. He has written extensively about literature and film. We are fortunate that he has moved to Santa Cruz and is eager to share his knowledge with us.  Our members who have  attended his classes were impressed by his encyclopedic knowledge of film and literature.

International Affairs: Fall 2019

 September 10, October 8, November 12   10-12 in the morning
 Location:  Fellowship Hall, Peace United Church of Christ     900 High Street
 Instructor; Ronnie Gruhn


          Session 1:   Updating US Foreign Policy; Europe, Middle East, China ,Environment, Migration etc
          Session 2:   Why Africa matters for the many crises afoot today
          Session 3:   New trends and new actors in world affairs.  Non state actors, changing role of state actors, decline of the US, rise of China, a messy Europe, populism, challenges to democracy
     

We are again fortunate to have Ronnie Gruhn, Professor Emerita of Politics at UCSC, as one of our teachers.  She has a passionate and undiminished interest in reading, writing, and talking about world affairs.  Her courses offer powerful insights into what is happening today.  Ronnie has been very generous in sharing her knowledge with OLLI members, and her courses have been exceedingly well attended.

The Birth of Contemporary Chinese Fiction in the  1920s

October 17, 24, 31, November 7, 14, 21   10am-12pm
Location: Museum of Art and History   705 Front St.
Instructor:  Dale Johnson

After the fall of the Ching Dynasty in 1908, Chinese intellectuals  experienced tremendous changes  that included going abroad to Japan and Europe, and a new idea of literature, which included writing fiction in the contemporary language.  Among the first and most successful writers was Lu Xun 1881-1936. He was among the first to write fiction in a western style. His reasons for writing fiction in his own words were: 

          "I feel today, as I did ten years ago, that I should write in the hope of enlightening my people, write about human life and the need to better it...I drew most of my characters from the unfortunates in our abnormal society, because I wanted to expose certain evils, arouse attention to them, and help them to cure them."

       Dale Johnson was Professor of Chinese at both Oberlin College and UCSC.  He has engagingly shared his love for and knowledge of Chinese literature in OLLI courses for the past six years.

Women in Western Civilization from Ancient Near East through the 18th Century

October 15, 22, 29, November 5, 10-12 in the morning
Location:  Museum of Art and History   705 Front St.
Instructor: Gail Greenwood

This class will review women's history taught in 2013-16 from Ancient Civilizations through the Renaissance, for the first two classes in order to establish the important concepts of Women's history as differentiated from Men's.  Then we will examine 16th-18th Century Europe and the development of the national states, Christianity, humanism, and colonialism as they applied to women.  The romp will be fast and obviously broad stroke--a survey.  Both men and women are welcome.

Now that Gail has completed two outstanding years as President of OLLI, she will again be sharing her teaching skills with us.   Gail Greenwood is a retired community college history teacher. For thirty-four years, she taught survey courses in American History, Western Civilization, and Women in both American and Western Civilization. In the 1970s she created the first Women in American History courses at American River College. Her students kept asking her to explain all the odd assumptions of the founding parents and wouldn’t accept her answer that “They brought the beliefs with them along with their Bibles, pots, and pillows.” She had to return to reading and studying and then she created a course about Women in Western Civilization. Her first startling discovery for one trained in modern Western Civilization with a focus on the Third Reich was that she ended up clear back in archaeology. Fortunately, this multidisciplinary approach didn’t bother folks at the community college, and she hopes it will also be accepted by lifelong learners willing to gallop through history.

Search for Life in the Universe

October 23, 30, November 6, 13, 20, 27,  10 -12 in the morning
Location:  Museum of Art and History     705 Front St,
Instructor:  Roger Knacke

Meetings:
Session 1 - The Cosmic Context for Life
Session 2 - Life on Earth
Session 3 - Search for Life on Mars
Session 4 - Search for Life in the Outer Solar System
Session 5 - Exoplanets
Session 6 - SETI Searches for Extraterrestrial Intelligence and Future Direction in the Search for Life

Dr. Roger Knacke is Emeritus Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Penn State Erie.  He retired as Director of the School of Science in 2010.   His research focused on interstellar matter and planetary atmosphere.

Film Comedy

November 25, December 2, 9, 16    9:30 to 12:30 in the morning
Location:  Museum of Art and History 705 Front St.
Instructor: Bill Park

In this course we will enjoy and examine four Hollywood comedies: City Lights (1931); It Happened One Night (1934); The Apartment (1960); and Groundhog Day (1993). Each of these films represents a different era, and each involves different social issues. Yet all four will contribute to our developing a theory of the very nature of comedy. 

Bill Park is an Emeritus Professor of Literature at Sarah Lawrence College, where he taught for many years. He received his PhD in Eighteenth Century English Literature from Columbia University. He has written extensively about literature and film. We are fortunate that he has moved to Santa Cruz and is eager to share his knowledge with us.  Our members who have attended his classes were impressed by his encyclopedic knowledge of film and literature.

2007 Modern Molecular Biology—Year 10

October 19, 26, November 2. 9. 16   10:30-12 in the morning
Location:  Physical Science Building, Room 240 UCSC
Instructors:  Barry Bowman and other UCSC faculty

A typical animal cell contains more than 40,000 different kinds of molecules.   In the past 20 years great progress has been made in understanding how these molecules combine and interact to form a living creature.  In this course five UCSC Professors will talk about recent discoveries in molecular biology.   Tentative topics for this year focus on new developments in the origin of life, understanding the genetic program that converts a fertilized egg into an adult animal, and the proteins that play a central role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

These talks are intended for a general audience.  A scientific background or knowledge of biology is not expected.  Barry Bowman, the course coordinator, will begin with a basic review of genes, proteins and cells.  This will be followed by talks that focus on specific topics in molecular biology.

Free parking is available at the Core West Parking Structure.